SCIENCE OF FLYING (KITES ARE FOR LEARNING)

kite

SCIENCE OF FLYING (KITES ARE FOR LEARNING)

 

The forces that are at work on a kite are the same forces that are at work on an airplane. No one should write off a kite as wasted time.

A kite is heavier than air and flys because air is in motion over its wings. Lift is created by the wind pressure resistance along the face of the kite. The wind pushes up the kite, like a hand. As long as the kite builder remembers this, a kite can have many shapes and will still fly. Drag is created by the turbulence in the air behind the kite. Gravity pulls on the weight of the kite and the lift must overcome it. Thrust is the power of the wind which creates the lift.

None of these facts takes away the poetry of seeing the kite in the sky. It is still the surest sign of spring. With this post I close out April, a windy month. May all your kites fly high.

 

About Mary T Kincaid

Writer of fiction and non-fiction for children of all ages. Love the mental age where the rules of logic are suspended and there is a willingness to enter the story world no matter what your physical age.

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Steve Porter
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Yes, there is a science behind kite-flying: aerodynamics, physics, and technology can explain the lift and drag of it all. There is also, however, another more magical element, one that seems to calm our souls and relax us, if only for the treasured moment. There is nothing quite like watching a kite weave and bob in the wind to unclutter the mind and free up our imagination, elating us with visions of various joys. For a little while time appears to stand absolutely still. Of course, there are the failures and frustrations of being unable to launch, of the crashes,… Read more »
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